Tonight’s Assignment: The Feed at Schuba’s


I’m heading with a couple other Halfstack staff members tonight to Schuba’s on Southport to see St. Louis power pop band The Feed.  They sound a bit like Brendan Benson’s solo stuff, with a lot of hand claps and “woo-woo”s.  Summer calls out for acts like this.  I’ll post my review and interview with them as soon as I’m done with it.

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Here’s My Interview with The Deltaz


I teased this yesterday, and the following is my conversation with roots band The Deltaz, who are playing again in Chicago at Moe’s Tavern on Milwaukee Ave. tonight.  They have an open, austere sound with real dirt to it, and lyrics that recall the demons of country’s past.  Plus they were gregarious and a blast to interview.  Here’s singer-guitarist Ted Siegel on their recent trip to New Orleans.

“We saw two guys get jumped in New Orleans, like, bloody. That was kind of strange. It was horrific. We were coming out of a gig in New Orleans. We’d heard about how New Orleans is kind of crime ridden with violence. We didn’t think too much of it. You know, you can be kind of ignorant when you’re in a new place. We were coming out of a show and all of a sudden these two big guys, big touristy looking guys, come running up to us and they were covered in blood. It looked unreal. They were like, ‘Oh my God, we were just jumped and robbed. Someone call the police.’ They were covered in blood. It was actually kind of a frightening experience.”
Read the rest of the interview at Halfstack Magazine.

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Tonight’s Assignment: The Deltaz at Uncommon Ground


I’ll be covering Los Angeles roots rock band The Deltaz tonight at Uncommon Ground on Chicago’s north side for Halfstack Magazine.  They’re no-frills types, a straightforward group.  Hollow guitars and ramblin’ man story songs.  They go on at 8.  I’ll sit down for an interview with the guys afterward, but otherwise I’ll be flying solo.  Anyone in the Chicago area who wants to get a beer with your favorite up-and-coming culture journalist, come say hi and let’s talk about the show.

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WAT-AAH Chicago Art Exhibit


As I wrote here almost two months ago — wow, I’ve been lazy around these parts — I have been working for Halfstack Magazine lately.  I’ve been getting up the gall to go full-on backpack journalist by being my own photographer, working from home, emailing the editor, etc.

Anyway, I attended an event Friday for WAT-AAH, a bottled water company with a neat marketing strategy of using street and graffiti artists to design their labels.  They expanded to Chicago after art exhibits in New York City and Washington D.C. in recent months.  My piece for Halfstack, “Using Street Art to Get Kids to Stay Hydrated,” has the run-down on everything, but here are the photos I didn’t have room for in the writeup.

There’s some gorgeous work in here.  There’s nothing monochromatic to be found.  Everything is bright, vibrant, and has the rush of passion instead of the rush of impatience.  Every brushstroke is fluid and athletic.  As WAT-AAH expands to other cities — CEO Rose Cameron told me Philadelphia, Miami, some Texas cities, Los Angeles, and others are in the offing — you should go and get your kids to drink more water by showing them how cool the labels are.
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July 22, 2014 · 11:22 pm

Read Me At Halfstack Magazine


I have joined the blogging team at Halfstack Magazine.  I will continue to post here, but there will be more Chicago entertainment and nightlife content from me over there.  My first post, a review of the Goodman Theatre’s production of The White Snake, was posted yesterday.  Go read it, comment, and if you’re in Chicago, go see the show before it closes on June 8.

I’ll post links here to any Halfstack articles I have coming up.  Stay tuned.

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Support Solar Roadways


This video has made the rounds on social media lately.  The idea to replace all existing American roads, parking lots, sidewalks, and driveways with smart, durable solar panels is an ambitious one.  It may even be ingenious.  It’s certainly worth more investment, which you can do at the engineer couple Scott and Julie Brusaw’s Solar Roadways Indiegogo page.

For all the entrepreneurial spirit described, and the gigantic, world changing effects of approximately tripling the United States’ energy output from non-carbon sources, this is not likely to be the silver bullet that solves climate change.  It will take years, maybe decades, of political wrangling, extreme investment from private, local, state, and federal funds, and it will face fierce opposition from people who stand to lose profits — namely, those in the carbon emission industries like oil and coal.

But, as should always be kept in mind, the good can not be the enemy of the perfect.  This will be a tremendous pain in the ass, with unprecedented construction, cost overruns, bitter and petty disputes, and any unforeseen consequences my small mind can’t currently fathom, but the benefits outweigh the headaches.

People like me in the polar north (Chicago) will no longer worry about the roads collecting traffic-slowing snow and sleet.  Expensive paint will no longer be needed to create medians because of the LED lights installed in the solar roads.  Power lines will be buried underground rather than subject to weather-related damage.  Electric car refueling ports can be installed at even intervals so nobody runs out of electricity on long road trips.  Other industries, like fiber internet, could join the effort to speed communication lines across the nation.  The job gains would be humongous for the initial construction and many could be sustainable for upkeep and repair.  Those repairs could be electronically monitored by the roads themselves, which would then alert repair crews.

And the big one: 100 percent energy independence from foreign oil and carbon (industries, not counting things like cattle flatulence) in general.  The United States would be world leaders in energy and our technologies and manufacturing would again be the most in demand in the world.

I’ve put down a meager investment, and you should, too.  It’s the best climate change solution I’ve seen for its utilization of economic growth, Jetsons-style futurism, and flexibility in helping to improve other industries.

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Filed under Environment, Politics

Gordon Willis Is Gone


Much will be written about the passing of cinematographer Gordon Willis in the coming days, about his contributions to cinema, his impeccable sense of lighting and composition, and the legends he helped create.  But none of it will do his work justice.  It won’t properly contextualize what he meant to the visual medium.  His greatness can only be experienced viscerally.

Perhaps his best known work was on The Godfather.

He caused a sensation throughout Hollywood with his lighting techniques in Klute.

He shot Woody Allen’s most beautiful film, Manhattan.

He changed film forever.  He darkened it, yes, but also made it a place where the austere could be more beautiful than the busy.  Understatement became overwhelmingly gorgeous in his eye.  The way a low-watt lightbulb’s glare filtered through his lens lent more to a scene’s power than any performance.  His figures were relatable but unknowable, lit just so to give them the power of myth.

And now that talent is gone.  It will be missed, but the transformative body of work that is left will forever be dissected, studied, beloved by cinema lovers.

Thank you, Prince of Darkness.

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